21 Comments
Jun 4Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

Such a beautiful perspective on living and dying. I was diagnosed with cancer at 44; I had 3 kids, 15, 13 and 10. I was changed forever. Now 22 years later, I am still living my life as if today may be the last day. I am deeply passionate about life, makes my husband very confused in so far as why I have so many projects in progress all the time. I believe until death looks you directly in your face, one cannot completely understand the gift of another day.

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Oh Cathy, thank you for sharing your experience and perspective. It’s so valuable ❤️

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Jun 5Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

Totally agree with you on that Cathy and am happy to hear you're living your life. From someone who is in the same boat, I get it. Every, single, day, I get it. Be well and happy

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Jun 5Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

Great post Katie and thank you for dragging this subject out into daylight and giving us all a timely reminder. My brother in law has a tat on his forearm that says "just visiting" So appropriate! Hugs. And I totally love the pic!

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I love that, Lori!

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Jun 5Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

He wears it proudly!

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Jun 4Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

i am a Death Doula and am now also working on my Funeral Director certification. i give this article two very enthusiastic thumbs up. yes yes yes.

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I appreciate this seal of approval very much!

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Jun 4Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

I loved this post. I'm currently in the search for a new job, and I've been using this framework (we all die someday, and who knows how much time I get here) to think about what I need in a job in order to live in line with my values and the kind of person I want to be. It sounds grim, but it doesn't feel grim to me! It provides a sort of clarity of what I'm looking for that is hard to access otherwise. Thank you for writing this Katie!

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What a smart way to approach the job hunt! Good luck finding something that fits your values, Kaziah!

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Katie, this is so beautiful. You made me cry this morning, thank you. I know you know I mean that. 🤍

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Carla, that means the world! ❤️

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Jun 4Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

I needed this so much this morning. Thanks for the reminder. I hope to channel my inner Jim Henson and approach death with curiosity and interest.

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Thank you for reading! Isn’t that such a lovely way to approach it?

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Jun 10Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

I enjoyed your piece very much, Katie. It reminded me of one of the poems I wrote a month ago about my sixteen year old soul puppy, Suki.

« Keenly aware of my mortality

I chose to sit with her

To mingle and explore

All the ways I wasted life

All the tears

And worst —Fears

Aware of the existence of the end

I struggled to find meaning in the day

Did it matter the water I consumed?

Or the wine that swirled in my head?

Did it make a difference if I stayed in bed?

Or I ran fast instead?

I stared her in the face

Death

Will you stay with me forever?

So I can taste life a little better »

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Thank you so much for sharing that poem, Stella! It's beautiful.

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Jun 11Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

Thanks, Katie. I'm so happy you enjoyed my poem. Grief has a way of stirring us back to life and inspiring us in the darkest times. I look forward to reading more of your work. Cheers to life, death, and everything in between.

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Jun 5Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

Thank you for this essay Katie.

In his book, "This Life: Secular Faith, Spiritual Freedom," Martin Hagglund argues that the finite quality of our life is what makes pursuing anything meaningful. Ever since I have read that (and the book in general, which goes into philosophical depth and explains what he means in more detail), I have been trying to meditate on the finiteness on my own life in order to make meaningful choices as much as I can.

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I love this. Thank you for the recommendation!

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Jun 6Liked by Katie Hawkins-Gaar

You're welcome. Hope you like it!

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Jun 4·edited Jun 4

Just think, in another 35-40 years you will still be eligible to become the president of the US. Even if you are half demented, suffering dementia, unable to walk, always tripping, stumbling and falling and can't string together more than a word or two, you have a future ahead of you unlike none other. And to top it off, there is free ice cream every day!

Death is not scary...it's how your life evolves in the last few years preceding it. My advice: Never get old.

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